Camp Schodack
Profile Jobs

Our Jobs

We are currently recruiting General Counselors and Activity Specialists in a range of areas.

Our staff orientation begins on June 20th and camp runs through until August 18th. We have rental groups attend the camp before and after our summer program and so there may be the opportunity to arrive early and stay after the campers leave, for staff that is looking to earn extra money. 

  • General Counselor/Group Leader (MALE)

    Bunk Life
    Nassau
    $2,500.00 / season

    Reports to a Division Head

    Every age group has its own Group Leader(s). A typical Group Leader would have 15 campers and 2 Bunk Counselors in his/her bunk though numbers can be higher or lower.

    While there are many facets to your job as a Group Leader, you have two basic responsibilities:

    l. The happiness and safety of all the campers in your group

    2. Monitoring the job performance of the other counselors in your

    group

    In order for you to be an effective Group Leader, your campers must like you and listen to you. In order for you and your campers to have the best possible summer, you must be successful in both of these areas.

    When working with your other counselors, you are constantly providing them with informal feedback on their job performance. At least twice during the summer, you provide a formal evaluation of each of your Bunk Counselors. The success of your leadership style and your ability to work with people will have a great deal to do with the way in which your group functions.

    You and your fellow Group Leaders, in conjunction with the Head Staff, help set the tone and determine the atmosphere of the summer. Every morning you meet with the Division Heads to discuss the specific plans for that day and to talk over any general concerns that affect everyone in camp.

    There are around 24 Group Leaders - half male and half female. You must have completed your freshman year of college, and it is strongly preferred that you have extensive experience with children and/or previous leadership experience.

    A Group Leader's job is both a demanding and challenging position. It is a position that offers a great opportunity for your own personal growth and development.

  • Baseball & Softball Instructor

    Activities
    $2,500.00 / season

    Reports to an Activity Counselor Supervisor

     

    The Activity:

    The Softball/Baseball Counselor at Camp Schodack teaches softball and/or baseball to all campers age 8 through 15.  Baseball and Softball clinics will be held during Camper Choice times.

     

    You must know the games well and must be able to teach all the basic skills at the different ability levels.  Experience in teaching children is very important since you will often have 12 to 20 campers during a 50-minute period.  During that time, you need to organize the campers into small groups so that all of the children are involved in learning basic skills.  You must know how to make the skill training motivating and fun for the campers. You usually have one or two bunk counselors to assist you during a regular activity period. 

     

    In addition to teaching basic skills and supervising softball/baseball games during the regular activity periods, you help to organize a camper softball and baseball games. You will talk to your ACS, who will help you in setting these up.

     

    There is also a batting cage and a pitching machine. You will be responsible for the safe operation of the area. Campers are not allowed to touch the pitching machine!

     

    During the day:

    You will be at the softball field teaching camper bunks unless you have a period off, and you will be there during all camper choice periods. You should use the morning paper (the SCOOP) and lineups – all camp gatherings for announcements - to spark interest in your activity. You will attend any scheduled meetings with your supervisor (ACS) and keep her/him informed of how each bunk is doing at your activity. At the end of the day you will make sure the equipment is put away and you will return any leftover clothing to Lost & Found. If we go to a softball or baseball intercamp you must make sure to know what equipment we need to bring with us.

     

    During the evening:

    You will join other activity counselors in helping to run the evening program. After evening program is finished you will have time off except for two nights a week when you sit OD (on duty) for a bunk.

     

    Other responsibilities:

    • You will write an article for the yearbook. This is an ongoing process through the summer and you should keep track of campers’ achievements and funny moments. There are other yearbooks on camp which serve as good examples.
    • You will make end-of-session awards for those campers who have participated most enthusiastically during the summer.
    • You will complete staff evaluations and make program recommendations for next year.
    • During rainy days you will be asked to help out in some way, either with your assigned bunk (called a CAIL bunk) or in running a special activity.
    • There are several special days during the summer and you will be asked to help in some way; for example, to help with parking on Visiting Day, or perhaps to be a bus counselor at the beginning or the end of camp.
    • There are three meals a day served in the dining hall and you are expected to attend all of them.
  • Camp Nurse

    Health Center
    Nassau
    $1,200.00 / week

     

    Camp Schodack is a beautiful, overnight camp for boys and girls in Upstate New York. Owned and operated by the Krouner family for 60 years, each summer Schodack creates a down-to-earth, friendly community. We are a small camp with boys and girls aged 7-16, and we value our medical staff immensely.

    We have four, full-time nurses and are looking for energetic and competent professionals with pediatric experience. Our Head Nurse, Health Center Coordinator and Nurse Practitioner are all returners to Schodack, which allows us to operate a smooth and cohesive medical team.

    Our salary is very competitive and your housing will consist of a private room with air conditioning, satellite television and a private bathroom and shower.

    We will make sure your experience with us this summer is a positive one and we look forward to speaking with you. Make sure to check out our website to learn more about us!

    www.schodack.com 

     

  • Culinary Arts/Cooking Instructor

    Activities
    Nassau
    $2,500.00 / season

    Reports to an Activity Counselor Supervisor

    The Activity:

    Culinary Arts was built for Summer 2019 and will start in Summer 2020.  Based on the popularity of outdoor cooking and scoring very high on camper surveys, we know this will be a very popular activity.  Culinary Arts takes place in a state of the art, air-conditioned kitchen.  Camper groups will come to culinary arts once a week for a double period (90 minutes).  Group size will be between 6 and 19, so the bunk counselors will be used to assist.   In addition to the three double periods, we will offer culinary arts as a sign up option a few times a week during the last campers choice of the day (I’m not sure this will work due to the cleaning that will need to take place).  We might consider this as a night activity occasionally for those that want more.      

     

    The popularity of the activity is directly related to your personality and teaching approach.  You must be knowledgeable about culinary arts, be able to make it fun for the campers, and be well liked by the children in order to make this activity a success.

    During the day:

    You will be at the culinary arts kitchen, teaching camper bunks unless you have a period off. You should use the morning paper (the SCOOP) and lineups (all camp gatherings for announcements) to spark interest in your activity. You will attend any scheduled meetings with your supervisor (ACS) and keep her/him informed of how each bunk is doing at your activity. At the end of the day you will make sure the equipment is put away, kitchen is clean and you will return any leftover clothing/personal items to Lost & Found.

    During the evening:

    You will join other activity counselors in helping to run the evening program. After evening program is finished you will have time off except for two nights a week when you sit OD (on duty) for a bunk.

    Other responsibilities:

    • You will write an article for the yearbook. This is an ongoing process through the summer and you should keep track of campers’ achievements and funny moments. There are other yearbooks on camp which serve as good examples.
    • You will make end-of-session awards for those campers who have participated most enthusiastically during the summer.
    • You will complete staff evaluations and make program recommendations for next year.
    • During rainy days you will be asked to help out in some way, either with your assigned bunk (called a Cail bunk) or in running a special activity.
    • There are several special days during the summer and you will be asked to help in some way; for example, to help with parking on Visiting Day, or perhaps to be a bus counselor at the beginning or end of camp.
    • There are three meals a day served in the dining hall and you are expected to attend all of them.
  • Division Leader (Male)

    Head Staff
    Nassau
    $4,000.00 / season

    This position is based within our Head Staff or Leadership Team and is a key role in supporting our campers and bunk staff before and throughout the summer.

    Reports to Assistant Director of Bunk Life

             The job of the Division Head is to supervise both the campers and staff in your division. The main part of your job to make sure that all of your campers and staff are emotionally and physically safe and having fun and happy at camp!

    You will be primarily responsible of approximately 3-4 bunks, 10-16 counselors, and 30-50 campers at a time.

             Below is a breakdown of your job into 3 categories: The Campers, The Staff, and General Responsibilities.  There will also be a DH calendar for the summer.  Most of your meetings and evaluations are roughly scheduled here for you, but it will be up to you to find the right time to have them.

    The Campers:

    *  Once at camp you will create your own binder.  Your binder consists of the following:

             - Notes taken from the camper profiles (green sheet)

             - The bed plans and bunk requests (You will go through each of the requests and    bed plans to make sure they are correct.)

             - The activity schedule (You will go through each bunk’s activity schedule and       make sure there is enough of each activity, not too many of one, or too many      watersports in a day, etc.)

    *  During the first few days of camp, you should be observing each one of your new campers.  Most of your calls within the first couple of days will be from parents of new campers so the more you know, with examples, the better off you will be on the phone.

    *  You should be interacting with your bunks.  The best way to prevent problems is to be around and in your bunks playing along.  There you will observe both camper and staff behaviors and also get to know everyone in your division.  You should set aside 2-3 periods a day to play and you should play with each bunk at a minimum every other day. (As a side note for this, please don’t always choose to go to the “best activity”.  Your staff will appreciate seeing you, and getting your help at the harder ones too.) Bunk clean-up time and shower time are great times to see your bunks as well.

    *  Camper Progress Forms.  You will be responsible for the passing out and collecting of them according to the dates on the administration calendar.  When they are collected you will read all of them and follow these steps:

             1.  Familiarize yourself with your camper profiles

             2.  Highlight the “important” aspects of the forms and initial that you read them.

    3.  Put them in the assistant director’s mailbox.

    *  Sit down with bunks throughout the summer for bunk meetings without the staff.  These should last almost a full period and should cover what is going on within the group, dynamics, problems, happiness, etc.  This is also a good time to ask the kids about their staff. These will be scheduled.

    *  Camper questionnaires.  You will pass out and collect the questionnaires once a week.  When collected you will tally the results and mark the name of any camper that marks down a fair or poor.  You should also respond to fair/poor answers immediately by talking to the camper(s) and finding out why.  Some notes should be jotted down on why they were fair/poor and a copy should be put in the assistant director’s mailbox.

    *  As a Division Head, part of your job is to do certain things every day to keep camp running smoothly and on-time. For example:

             Being in your bunks every morning for wake-up.

             Being a presence during bunk clean-up.

             Supervision in the dining hall.

             Have your walkie-talkie on and working.

             Being around during shower times.

             Assisting at night activity and canteen.

     

    *  In the last week of each session, you must do an End of Season report with specific details on any camper that you feel shouldn’t return for future summers or had issues in the bunk that need to be discussed before next summer.  These will go in assistant director’s mailbox.

    The Staff:

    *  On the first day of orientation, you should meet and greet your staff with a terrific welcome.  You should all work together on this to find a system, so nobody is left on their own.  You should also create a caring atmosphere in their bunk by putting up welcome signs and bed signs.

    *  The way you are asked to play with your campers to get to know them, you should find a way to do the same for your staff.  For some staff that means playing activities, for others it is just a quick conversation about how they are doing. It is very important to show that you like your staff and that you know as much as you can about them.

    *  You should informally observe your staff working with the kids at activities, meals, cleanup, etc. This will help come evaluation time.

    *  You will need to inform Assistant Director for Bunk Life of any staff issues that come up.  Please do not feel that any problem is too small and remember that if your staff is happy, your kids will be happy, and anything we as a camp can do to make staff happy, we should do.

    *  Meet with each of your bunk staffs as a group at different times throughout the summer.  Here you will discuss bunk issues as a whole like dynamics, happiness, issues, activities, and what can be done to make the group happier than they are now.  That is also a great time to go over the feedback from the camper questionnaires without giving specific numbers or names.

    *  You should follow the administration calendar and do two evaluations of each of your staff.  They will be done around the 10th day the kids are there and then again around week 5 of camp. You will write these evaluations and then sit and discuss this with them. Honest feedback if the best way to assist and motivate your staff.

    *  At the end of camp, you must fill out a final evaluation of each of your staff members to use in the off season for rehiring.

    General Responsibilities:

    *  Head OD and OD list for your night (OD = On Duty)

    *  Trip Leader and coverage

    *  Weekly Cookout

    *  Line-Up

    *  Blister Day

    *  Night Activity (presence at...)

    *  Night Canteen

    *  Help plan and facilitate Orientation

    *  Fire Drills

    *  Assist SPEC with Special Events

    *  Monitor bunk parties

    *  Assist with Tribals

    *  Letter Writing

    *  Inspection

    *  Yearbook Article

    *  Day Off switches for your bunks' supervision

    *  “Day-Off-Sleep-In-Bunk” - responsible to get coverage for your bunks on days off.

     

     

  • Go-Karts Instructor

    Activit
    Nassau
    $2,500.00 / season

    Reports to an Activity Counselor Supervisor

     

    The Activity:

    The two Go-Kart (at Camp Schodack, we call them SchoKart Counselors) teach 6 - 10 campers per period at the SchoKart track. Each age group is scheduled for SchoKarts approximately once or twice a week for 45 minutes each time.  The period runs in conjunction with Mountain Biking – meaning the campers can choose which of the two activities to do. In addition, a number of campers will come every day during their Camper Choice periods.  About 10 campers can go during each C.C. period – the amount of time they get on the track is obviously dependent on how many show up.

     

    We have three 170cc Polaris schokarts and four 150 cc Hamerhead schokarts. 

    Only three units are ever on the track at the same time.

    The speed of the karts have been reduced and regulated to a slower and safer speed. At no time should the kart’s throttles be changed without permission of the Assistant Director or Director. Any approved changes will only be done by the maintenance department.

     

    Your job will require you to:

                Do minor repairs

                Complete the Day Checklist first thing every morning,

                Do some raking and maintenance to the track itself 

                Fulfill other duties that fall under the Schokart program.

     

    During the day:

    Both of you will be at the Schokart track during the six activity periods and the three camper choice periods. You will have assigned periods off during the day as well.

     

    End of the day:

    You will make sure the karts, helmets and goggles are put away and locked and you will return any leftover clothing to the appropriate bunk or lost and found cubbie.

     

    During the evening:

    You will join your CAIL bunk and other activity counselors in helping to run the evening program. After evening program is finished you will have time off except for two nights a week when you sit OD (on duty) for a bunk.

     

    Rainy Days:

    In the event of rain, you, your ACS, and your Program Director will cooperatively decide whether or not to cancel the activity; and when and if you will resume the activity.

    The ACS will help you reschedule groups that miss the activity due to weather.

     

    Other responsibilities:

    * Set up the Camp Schodack Driving Test (See binder and meet with ACS and Program   Coordinator for details)

    * Make sure we have copies of licenses to be handed out: these should show the year but should not contain signatures.

    * You will attend any scheduled meetings with your supervisor (ACS) and keep her/him informed of how each bunk is doing at your activity.

    * In order to spark interest in your activity. You should use the morning paper, the SCOOP, and lineups (a twice daily all-camp gathering) for announcements –

    * During rainy days you will be asked to help out in some way, either with your assigned bunk (called a CAIL bunk) or in running a special activity.

    * There are several special days during the summer and you will be asked to help in some way; for example, to help with parking on Visiting Day, or perhaps to be a bus counselor at the beginning or the end of camp.

    * There are three meals a day served in the dining hall and you are expected to attend all of them.

    * You will write an article for the yearbook. This is an ongoing process through the summer and you should keep track of campers' achievements and funny moments. There are other yearbooks on camp, which serve as good examples.

    * You will make end-of-session awards (occurs twice) for those campers who have participated most enthusiastically during the summer.

    * You will complete staff evaluations and make program recommendations for next year.

     

  • Golf Instructor

    Activities
    Nassau
    $2,500.00 / season

    Reports to an Activity Counselor Supervisor 

     

    The Activity:

    There is a 150-yard driving range with individual driving cubicles for nine campers.  This is where all of the golf instruction takes place.  We have many right-handed and left-handed irons and woods for the campers; these come in different sizes.  In addition, we have hundreds of golf balls.  (The campers pick up their own balls with pick-up bag shags).

     

    Two or three times during the summer, you will be taking small groups of the more motivated golfers to a regular nearby 9-hole course, called Evergreen Golf Course.  The Programming Director and/or ACS will set up these trips and alert you to the times that they will take place.

     

    Usually 10 - 12 campers come to golf each 50-minute period.  Most of the children are beginners.  While many campers like golf, others find it boring.  All campers have golf on their daily schedule, but it is combined with Horseback Riding.  This should help ensure that the campers you get are slightly motivated to do your activity, but even if they are not, you must develop ways to make your instruction fun and challenging.  Contests, games, and an enthusiastic approach are vital to the success of your activity.

     

    During the day:

    You will be at the driving range teaching camper bunks unless you have a period off. You should use the morning paper and lineups to spark interest in your activity. You will attend any scheduled meetings with your supervisor (ACS) and keep her/him informed of how each bunk is doing at your activity. At the end of the day you will make sure the equipment is put away and you will return any leftover clothing to the appropriate bunk.

     

    During the evening:

    You will join other activity counselors in helping to run the evening program. After evening program is finished you will have time off except for two nights a week when you sit OD (on duty) for a bunk.

     

    Other responsibilities:

    • You will write an article for the yearbook. This is an ongoing process through the summer and you should keep track of campers’ achievements and funny moments. There are other yearbooks on camp, which serve as good examples.
    • You will make end-of-session awards for those campers who have participated most enthusiastically during the summer.
    • You will complete staff evaluations and make program recommendations for next year.
    • During rainy days you will be asked to help out in some way, either with your assigned bunk (called a CAIL bunk) or in running a special activity.
    • There are several special days during the summer and you will be asked to help in some way; for example, to help with parking on Visiting Day, or perhaps to be a bus counselor at the beginning or end of camp.
    • There are three meals a day served in the dining hall and you are expected to attend all of them.
  • Lifeguards/Swim Instructors

    Activities Dept.
    Nassau
    $2,500.00 / season

    Qualifications;

    1) You will be a qualified lifeguard - We can provide this in house at Camp.

    2) You have experience teaching children to swim.

    3) Ideally you will be WSI certified.

     

    You must have your Lifeguard Certificationand have considerable experience teaching all ability levels in a group setting. Ideally, you will be certified in WSI.  You must be knowledgeable about swim instruction and have an excellent rapport with children.  At Schodack, it is not enough to know how to teach swimming.  You must also be liked by the campers.

     

    The Activity:

    Our Swimming Program takes place at our two filtered pools. The first is a 75' by 35' pool.  Pool depth ranges from 2 - 8.5 feet.  The pool can be divided into 2 swimming areas: the 3 - 5 foot area, and the 5 - 8.5 foot area. The second pool is a 25-meter lap pool (roughly 82’) and the depths are 3.5 feet to 5.5 feet.  The pool staff consists of the Head Instructor and 5 Assistant Instructors.

     

    The Swimming Program:

                1.      Instructional Swim:  (American Red Cross Program)

    1. Most age groups have instruction swim 2 - 5 times a week.
    2. You will teach 6 instructional periods a day.  Each period is about 50 minutes long.
    3. The class size of each instructional group is between 12 - 25 campers, split among the instructors.
    4. Bunk Counselors can be used as extra assistants.

     

                2.      Camper Choice:

    1. This is offered to all campers three times a day for 50 minutes each.
    2. Usually 10-100 campers swim at these times depending on the weather.

     

                3.      Night Swims:

    1. This is done occasionally during the summer on very hot nights.  See the SPEC for a schedule for when divisions or the staff have them.
    2. There is no night swimming unless the pool is lit.

     

                4.      Blister/General Swim Days:

    1. When the temperature is over 90 degrees Fahrenheit, activities may be canceled and the pool is open for free swim for an extended time period.

     

                5.      Miscellaneous:

    1. This includes water basketball, competitive swimming, water volleyball, and water aerobics.
    2. In addition to instruction and general swim supervision, the Pool Staff is required to maintain the pool, the filters, and the chlorine levels.  Pool maintenance involves approximately one hour a day of your time.
    3. You will also have bunk responsibilities which will be described during Orientation.

    During the day:

    You will be at the pool teaching camper bunks during regular periods, and you will be at the pool during camper choices unless you have a period off. You should use the morning paper and lineups to spark interest in your activity. You will attend any scheduled meetings with your supervisor (ACS) and keep her/him informed of how each bunk is doing at your activity. At the end of the day you will make sure the equipment is put away and you will return any leftover clothing to the appropriate bunk or the Lost and Found.

     

    During the evening:

    You will join other activity counselors in helping to run the evening program. After evening program is finished you will have time off except for two nights a week when you sit OD (on duty) for a bunk.

    Other responsibilities:

    • You will write an article for the yearbook. This is an ongoing process through the summer and you should keep track of campers’ achievements and funny moments. There are other yearbooks on camp, which serve as good examples.
    • You will make end-of-session awards for those campers who have participated most enthusiastically during the summer.
    • You will fill out the American Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Activity Report (and the addendum), show them to your supervisor and mail them/take them to the Red Cross.
    • You will fill out Red Cross certificates for those campers who passed ARC levels.
    • You will complete staff evaluations and make program recommendations for next year.
    • During rainy days you will be asked to help out in some way, either with your assigned bunk (called a CAIL bunk) or in running a special activity.
    • There are several special days during the summer and you will be asked to help in some way; for example, to help with parking on Visiting Day, or perhaps to be a bus counselor at the beginning or end of camp.
    • There are three meals a day served in the dining hall and you are expected to attend all of them.
  • Office Assistant

    Office
    Nassau
    $6,000.00 / season

    Camp Schodack is looking for a friendly, organized, and professional office assistant for their fast-paced and fun office. Managed by the Office Manager, the Office Assistant will be handling incoming parent phone calls and other communications, greeting tours and visitors, organizing transportation, as well updating paperwork and other documents, making copies, and performing other general office projects and errands as needed.

    Responsibilities 

    • Manage the front desk/reception operations, acting as the first point of contact for vendors, guests, staff, and campers

    • Perform general administrative tasks, including answering and directing phone calls (often from parents, vendors, staff, etc.)

    • Making copies, and updating and sorting files

    • Process, sort, and route incoming and outgoing mail, packages, and email

    • Keep the office tidy, stocked, and organized

    • Coordinate transportation for campers and staff 

    • Drive a camp provided and insured vehicle to run errands (i.e. pick up a prescription, run to the post office, do some shopping, etc.)

    • Provide ad-hoc support to the office, directors, and other staff members as needed

    Job skills/requirements

    • Excellent interpersonal and organizational skills

    • Strong time-management skills and multitasking ability

    • Proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, and Google Suite

    • A valid driver’s licenses and an excellent driving record

    • Enjoy working around children, teenagers, and adults

    Dates and Compensation

    June 18, 2022 - August 20, 2022 

    $6,000, season

  • Ropes/Challenge Course Instructor

    Activities
    $2,500.00 / season

    QUALIFICATIONS:

                * Training and experience with adventure/ropes course programs (training course in June at camp)

                * Current CPR and first aid certifications (can take courses at camp)

                * Ability to assist with ropes course program using the course designed for camp

                * Ability to assist with Climbing Wall

                * Not afraid of heights

                * Ability to assist in maintaining ropes courses in excellent working condition

                * Desire and ability to work with children

                * Minimum 20 years of age (Head), 17 years of age (Assistant)

     

    The Activity:

    As part of the Ropes Course Team, you will be responsible for the overall program, including the High (7 elements) and Low (5 elements) Challenge Courses, a Climbing Tower and a 300-yard zip line.  The Ropes Team consists of one Head and four assistants.

     

    SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES: 

    1. In June, take Camp Schodack’s Ropes Course training run by Project Adventure.
    2. Set up challenge/ropes course prior to and during staff training.
    3. Participate in Camp Schodack Staff Training.
    4. Teach and monitor proper use of equipment (maintain rope logs, accident and close call reports).
    5. Conduct initial and end-of-season inventory, and store equipment for safety.
    6. Check equipment and make repairs and replacements when needed.
    7. Conduct daily tasks;
      1. Setup and take down of course daily routine.
      2. Properly store all gear and hardware daily.
      3. Check of equipment for safety, cleanliness, and good repair.
      4. Prepare the daily schedule (who is going where).
      5. Put campers’ names in the SCOOP, camp’s daily newspaper.
    8. Follow standards and rules applicable to activity.
    9. Evaluate season; make recommendations for equipment, supplies, and program for following year.

     

    During the day:

    You will be at the ropes course teaching camper bunks or assigned groups unless you have a period off, and you will be at the ropes course or zip line during all camper choice periods. You should use the morning paper and lineups to spark interest in your activity. You will attend any scheduled meetings with your supervisor (ACS) and keep her/him informed of how each bunk is doing at your activity. At the end of the day you will make sure the equipment is put away and you will return any leftover clothing to the appropriate bunk.

     

    During the evening:

    You will join other activity counselors in helping to run the evening program. After evening program is finished you will have time off except for two nights a week when you sit OD (on duty) for a bunk.

     

    Other responsibilities:

     

    • You will write an article for the yearbook. This is an ongoing process through the summer and you should keep track of campers’ achievements and funny moments. There are other yearbooks on camp which serve as good examples.
    • You will make end-of-session awards for those campers who have participated most enthusiastically during the summer.
    • You will complete staff evaluations and make program recommendations for next year.
    • During rainy days you will be asked to help out in some way, either with your assigned bunk (called a CAIL bunk) or in running a special activity.
    • There are several special days during the summer and you will be asked to help in some way; for example, to help with parking on Visiting Day, or perhaps to be a bus counselor at the beginning or end of camp.
    • There are three meals a day served in the dining hall and you are expected to attend all of them.
  • Soccer Instructor

    Activities
    Nassau
    $2,500.00 / season

    CAMP SCHODACK

     

    JOB DESCRIPTION  - SOCCER COUNSELOR

    Reports to ACS

    Essential Function: must be able to play the game of soccer to a high standard and have verified soccer coaching experience.

     

    The Activity:

    Soccer is one of the most popular land sport activities at Camp Schodack.  We play on two flat, grassy fields that are about three-quarters and half of the size of a regulation field respectively. We have 15-20 soccer balls (sizes 4, and 5) and encourage a teaching style that actively involves all the campers with lots of ball touches.

     

    Our campers play at different levels of ability.  While some love the sport, others are less enthusiastic.  It is up to you to motivate all of the campers and make the activity enjoyable.  You need to use fun, innovative, and varied (the kids get bored easily) drills and games to teach the necessary skills.  The soccer counselor should approach each drill with at least 3 to 4 ideas in mind in case they don't go as smoothly as planned.

    There are different aspects of the soccer program:

     

    1. Each age group of girls and boys (10-18 campers per group) has 50 minutes of soccer once or twice a week. 
    2. For those campers who love soccer and want to play more competitively, there are League games.
    3. There are inter-camp teams (for ages 7-11 and 12-15) that occasionally play other camps.  The Programming Director will have already put together a list of intercamps for you. You must make sure to know what equipment we need to bring with us.

     

    Most of our campers play at the beginner or intermediate level.  We have a few who have more advanced skills.  Past experience has shown that the Soccer Counselor who knows how to teach and who is friendly, funny, and enthusiastic, will have the most success with the program.

     

    During the day:

    You will be at the soccer fields teaching camper bunks unless you have a period off, and you will be at the field during all camper choice periods. You should use the morning paper and lineups to spark interest in your activity. You will attend any scheduled meetings with your supervisor (ACS) and keep her/him informed of how each bunk is doing at your activity. At the end of the day you will make sure the balls are put away and you will return any leftover clothing to the appropriate bunk or lost and found cubbie.

     

    During the evening:

    You will sometimes join other activity counselors in helping to run the evening program. Often this is when you will be involved in helping run the skills clinics for the dedicated players under the lights. After evening program is finished you will have time off except for two nights a week when you sit OD (on duty) for a bunk.

     

    Other responsibilities:

    • You will write an article for the yearbook. This is an ongoing process through the summer and you should keep track of campers’ achievements and funny moments. There are other yearbooks on camp which serve as good examples.
    • You will make end-of-session awards for those campers who have participated most enthusiastically during the summer.
    • You will complete staff evaluations and make program recommendations for next year.
    • During rainy days you will be asked to help out in some way, either with your assigned bunk (called a CAIL bunk) or in running a special activity.
    • There are several special days during the summer and you will be asked to help in some way; for example, to help with parking on Visiting Day, or perhaps to be a bus counselor at the beginning or end of camp.
    • There are three meals a day served in the dining hall and you are expected to attend all of them.
  • Tennis Instructor

    Activities
    Nassau
    $2,500.00 / hour

    Reports to an Activity Counselor Supervisor 

     

    The Activity:

    The tennis staff consists of the Head Instructor and two or three Assistant Instructors.  Each instructor teaches several campers during each activity period along with other tennis staff.  It is the responsibility of the Head Instructor to organize each tennis period so that these campers are distributed among the instructors in a way that will promote the best instructional situation.  Each age group comes to tennis for a 50-minute period once or twice a week.

     

    There are six 50-minute instructional periods a day. In addition, the tennis courts are open for camper choice during the morning, afternoon, and after dinner. Each member of the tennis staff may be able to take one period off a day at the discretion of the Head Tennis Counselor.

     

    In addition, the Head Tennis Counselor will:

    1. See that all campers are taught skills appropriate to their skill level - beginner through advanced.
    2. Make tennis instruction fun by organizing games, contests, relays, themes, etc.
    3. Organize the Camp Tennis Tournaments.
    4. Publicize the tennis program through lineup and frequent announcements in the newspaper along with other tennis staff.
    5. Get support from the other Tennis Staff to conduct sign-ups for campers to get 1-on-1 training from a Tennis professional that visits camp weekly.
    6. Organize teams of singles and doubles for intercampus.

     

    During the day:

    You will be at tennis teaching camper bunks unless you have a period off, and you will be on the courts during all camper choice periods. You should use the morning paper and lineups to spark interest in your activity. You will attend any scheduled meetings with your supervisor (ACS) and keep her/him informed of how each bunk is doing at your activity. At the end of the day you will make sure the equipment is put away and you will return any leftover clothing to Lost & Found.

     

    During the evening:

    You will join other activity counselors in helping to run the evening program. After evening program is finished you will have time off except for two nights a week when you sit OD (on duty) for a bunk.

     

    Other responsibilities:

    • You will write an article for the yearbook. This is an ongoing process through the summer and you should keep track of campers’ achievements and funny moments. There are other yearbooks on camp which serve as good examples.
    • You will make end-of-season awards for those campers who have participated most enthusiastically during the summer.
    • You will complete staff evaluations and make program recommendations for next year.
    • During rainy days you will be asked to help out in some way, either with your assigned bunk (called a CAIL bunk) or in running a special activity.
    • There are several special days during the summer and you will be asked to help in some way; for example, to help with parking on Visiting Day, or perhaps to be a bus counselor at the beginning or end of camp.
    • There are three meals a day served in the dining hall and you are expected to attend all of them.
  • Volleyball Instructor

    Activities
    Nassau
    $2,500.00 / season

    Reports to an Activity Counselor Supervisor

     

    The Activity:

    As a Volleyball Counselor, you will be teaching newcomb and volleyball to the younger campers (8-10) and volleyball to the older campers (11-15) as well.  Each of the camper groups will come to your activity once or twice a week for 45 minutes a time.  There are around 20 groups of 8-16 campers in each group. The boys' and girls' groups play separately by age.  Most campers are at the beginner and intermediate level. We have few advanced-level players.

     

    Your main goal is to make your activity fun, exciting and to teach campers the basic skills and vocabulary of volleyball.  At the same time, you will want to help the campers improve their level of play.  You will need to know 6 to 8 enjoyable lead up games and drills for each age group that will teach the skills both for throwing and catching (for Newcomb) and for volleyball skill development.

     

    Flexibility in teaching volleyball/newcomb is very important. You should feel comfortable in altering the rules of the game if it will make it more fun for the campers.  Our goal is for the campers to enjoy playing volleyball and for them to learn new skills.

     

    Recently, a second, lower to the ground net was purchased for volleyball.  The goal with this net is to provide you with a way differentiate and modify your instruction, using the lower net in ways and areas that you see it being beneficial.  For example, one area is that the lower net is great for younger players without the strength to get it up and over the larger net.  Secondly, for older players who have the skill, but maybe not the jumping ability, they can use the lower net to work on spiking.  You should also develop other ways to use this small net to your advantage when teaching.

     

     

    During the day:

    You will be at the volleyball courts teaching camper bunks unless you have a period off, and you will be at the courts during all camper choice periods. You should use the morning paper and lineups to spark interest in your activity. You will attend any scheduled meetings with your supervisor (ACS) and keep her/him informed of how each bunk is doing. At the end of the day you will make sure the equipment is put away and you will return any leftover clothing to the appropriate bunk.

     

     

    During the evening:

    You will help to run the evening program with other counselors. After evening program is finished you will be free except for two nights a week when you sit OD (on duty) for a bunk.

     

    Other responsibilities:

    • You will write an article for the yearbook. This is an ongoing process through the summer and you should keep track of campers’ achievements and funny moments. There are other yearbooks on camp which serve as good examples.
    • You will make end-of-session awards for those campers who have participated most enthusiastically during the summer.
    • You will complete staff evaluations and make program recommendations for next year.
    • During rainy days you will be asked to help out in some way, either with your assigned bunk (called a CAIL bunk) or in running a special activity.
    • There are several special days during the summer and you will be asked to help in some way; for example, to help with parking on Visiting Day, or perhaps to be a bus counselor at the beginning or end of camp.
    • There are three meals a day served in the dining hall and you are expected to attend all of them.
  • Waterskiing Instructors

    Activities
    Nassau
    $2,500.00 / season

    Reports to an Activity Counselor Supervisor

     

    Qualifications:

    • You shall be a lifeguard, certified by the American Red Cross.

     

    The Activity:

    We have two separate waterfront areas at Camp Schodack.  One is the pool area where all swim instruction and free swimming takes place.  The other is the lake where all the small craft activities are held.  There is no swimming program at the lake.  There is no beach at the lakefront.

     

    The lake (Burden Lake) is ten minutes’ drive from our main campus.  Campers are driven to the lake in vans or a bus.  The lake is round and covers 173 acres.  We have our own dock area and have the following equipment:

    • 3 - Malibu, 310 HP Ski Boats with inboard motors – with a fiberglass boom for beginner skiers,
    • 4 - 17' Aluminum Canoes
    • 13 Funyaks (one person plastic kayaks)        

     

    The lakefront staff consists of the Head Lake, 6 Water-skiing Counselors. As one of the Water-skiing Instructors you must have boat driving experience, have Lifesaving Certification and CPR, and have taught water-skiing. Water-skiing is an extremely popular activity at Camp Schodack.  We have many enthusiastic skiers at all different levels of ability.  There are many campers who are very anxious to learn how to ski for the first time this summer. Waterski counselors are also responsible for running the small crafts program on a daily rotation basis. The rotation is determined by the ACS and the Head Lake and will be discussed during orientation.

     

    The responsibilities of the Water-ski Instructors are:

    1. Share the teaching/boat driving responsibilities - You must be proficient at driving skiers of all abilities.     
    2. Establish and enforce safety procedures.
    3. Teach beginner, intermediate, and advanced water-skiers.
    4. Organize the water-ski periods in such a way that there is full utilization of time.     
    5. Be responsible for the gas and oil for the motors, maintain the water-skis, boat, ropes, and life vests.
    6. Assist with “Camper Choice” sign-up (See below).
    7. Thoroughly know and practice Lake emergency procedures.
      1. A formal drill session with the Nursing Staff and Programming Director will be observed during Orientation.
      2.  The Programming Director or any member of the Admin. Staff has the authority to order additional practice drills for observation at any point during the summer.

    During the day:

    You will be at the Lake whenever campers are there. You should be positioned either on the dock, at the top of the stairs, or working with campers out on the Lake, supervising camper bunks.  You will be at Lake throughout the day during regular scheduled activities, during Rest Hour (but will have 3rd Camper’s Choice off as compensation), and you will be at the Lake during the first 2 Camper Choice periods, though these are regular scheduled times for specific bunks to be at the Lake. You will attend any scheduled meetings with your supervisor (ACS) and keep her/him informed of how each bunk is doing at your activity.  One exception may be the ACS morning meeting if it coincides with a Lake period for any bunks.  At the end of the day you will make sure the equipment is put away and you will return any clothing to Lost & Found.

     

    During the evening:

    You will join other activity counselors in helping to run the evening program. After evening program is finished you will have time off except for two nights a week when you sit OD (on duty) for a bunk.

     

    Other responsibilities:

    * You will write an article for the yearbook. This is an ongoing process through the summer and you should keep track of campers’ achievements and funny moments. There are other yearbooks on camp, which serve as good examples.

    * You will make end-of-session awards for those campers who have participated most enthusiastically during the summer.

    * You will complete staff evaluations and make program recommendations for next year.

    * During rainy days you will be asked to help out in some way, either with your assigned bunk (called a CAIL bunk) or in running a special activity.

    * There are several special days during the summer and you will be asked to help in some way; for example, to help with parking on Visiting Day, or perhaps to be a bus counselor at the beginning or end of camp.

     

  • Division Leader (Female)

    Bunk Life
    Nassau
    $4,000.00 / season

    This position is based within our Head Staff or Leadership Team and is a key role in supporting our campers and bunk staff before and throughout the summer.

    Reports to Assistant Director of Bunk Life

             The job of the Division Head is to supervise both the campers and staff in your division. The main part of your job to make sure that all of your campers and staff are emotionally and physically safe and having fun and happy at camp!

    You will be primarily responsible of approximately 3-4 bunks, 10-16 counselors, and 30-50 campers at a time.

             Below is a breakdown of your job into 3 categories: The Campers, The Staff, and General Responsibilities.  There will also be a DH calendar for the summer.  Most of your meetings and evaluations are roughly scheduled here for you, but it will be up to you to find the right time to have them.

    The Campers:

    *  Once at camp you will create your own binder.  Your binder consists of the following:

             - Notes taken from the camper profiles (green sheet)

             - The bed plans and bunk requests (You will go through each of the requests and    bed plans to make sure they are correct.)

             - The activity schedule (You will go through each bunk’s activity schedule and       make sure there is enough of each activity, not too many of one, or too many      watersports in a day, etc.)

    *  During the first few days of camp, you should be observing each one of your new campers.  Most of your calls within the first couple of days will be from parents of new campers so the more you know, with examples, the better off you will be on the phone.

    *  You should be interacting with your bunks.  The best way to prevent problems is to be around and in your bunks playing along.  There you will observe both camper and staff behaviors and also get to know everyone in your division.  You should set aside 2-3 periods a day to play and you should play with each bunk at a minimum every other day. (As a side note for this, please don’t always choose to go to the “best activity”.  Your staff will appreciate seeing you, and getting your help at the harder ones too.) Bunk clean-up time and shower time are great times to see your bunks as well.

    *  Camper Progress Forms.  You will be responsible for the passing out and collecting of them according to the dates on the administration calendar.  When they are collected you will read all of them and follow these steps:

             1.  Familiarize yourself with your camper profiles

             2.  Highlight the “important” aspects of the forms and initial that you read them.

    3.  Put them in the assistant director’s mailbox.

    *  Sit down with bunks throughout the summer for bunk meetings without the staff.  These should last almost a full period and should cover what is going on within the group, dynamics, problems, happiness, etc.  This is also a good time to ask the kids about their staff. These will be scheduled.

    *  Camper questionnaires.  You will pass out and collect the questionnaires once a week.  When collected you will tally the results and mark the name of any camper that marks down a fair or poor.  You should also respond to fair/poor answers immediately by talking to the camper(s) and finding out why.  Some notes should be jotted down on why they were fair/poor and a copy should be put in the assistant director’s mailbox.

    *  As a Division Head, part of your job is to do certain things every day to keep camp running smoothly and on-time. For example:

             Being in your bunks every morning for wake-up.

             Being a presence during bunk clean-up.

             Supervision in the dining hall.

             Have your walkie-talkie on and working.

             Being around during shower times.

             Assisting at night activity and canteen.

     

    *  In the last week of each session, you must do an End of Season report with specific details on any camper that you feel shouldn’t return for future summers or had issues in the bunk that need to be discussed before next summer.  These will go in assistant director’s mailbox.

    The Staff:

    *  On the first day of orientation, you should meet and greet your staff with a terrific welcome.  You should all work together on this to find a system, so nobody is left on their own.  You should also create a caring atmosphere in their bunk by putting up welcome signs and bed signs.

    *  The way you are asked to play with your campers to get to know them, you should find a way to do the same for your staff.  For some staff that means playing activities, for others it is just a quick conversation about how they are doing. It is very important to show that you like your staff and that you know as much as you can about them.

    *  You should informally observe your staff working with the kids at activities, meals, cleanup, etc. This will help come evaluation time.

    *  You will need to inform Assistant Director for Bunk Life of any staff issues that come up.  Please do not feel that any problem is too small and remember that if your staff is happy, your kids will be happy, and anything we as a camp can do to make staff happy, we should do.

    *  Meet with each of your bunk staffs as a group at different times throughout the summer.  Here you will discuss bunk issues as a whole like dynamics, happiness, issues, activities, and what can be done to make the group happier than they are now.  That is also a great time to go over the feedback from the camper questionnaires without giving specific numbers or names.

    *  You should follow the administration calendar and do two evaluations of each of your staff.  They will be done around the 10th day the kids are there and then again around week 5 of camp. You will write these evaluations and then sit and discuss this with them. Honest feedback if the best way to assist and motivate your staff.

    *  At the end of camp, you must fill out a final evaluation of each of your staff members to use in the off season for rehiring.

    General Responsibilities:

    *  Head OD and OD list for your night (OD = On Duty)

    *  Trip Leader and coverage

    *  Weekly Cookout

    *  Line-Up

    *  Blister Day

    *  Night Activity (presence at...)

    *  Night Canteen

    *  Help plan and facilitate Orientation

    *  Fire Drills

    *  Assist SPEC with Special Events

    *  Monitor bunk parties

    *  Assist with Tribals

    *  Letter Writing

    *  Inspection

    *  Yearbook Article

    *  Day Off switches for your bunks' supervision

    *  “Day-Off-Sleep-In-Bunk” - responsible to get coverage for your bunks on days off.

How to Apply

Head over to the staff section of our website and complete our application form, or contact us directly to arrange an interview or an informal chat.


Contact Camp Schodack